Hutker Architects

Our Firm

  • About Us
  • Philosophy
  • Portfolio
  • Working at Hutker
  • In the Community

For more than 30 years, the team at Hutker Architects has been helping families and individuals create one-of-a-kind homes in New England. Our process begins with listening. We work together to create a program of indoor and outdoor spaces that will best support the way you live, work, and play.

We begin each project by learning about the particulars of the site and the priorities of the individuals who will live in the house. From there, we establish desired life patterns and work to create spaces that make the most of a home’s unique location while creating spaces that support and anticipate our clients’ lives today and in the future.

Hutker Architects has designed more than three hundred houses along the New England shore and beyond. The firm is committed to the principle “build once, well,” looking to the historic architecture of the region as inspiration for original, contemporary design.

View our portfolio gallery to learn more…

Hutker Architects is a team of 50 professionals who share a belief that houses are the most important structures people occupy. Our team is passionate about design and committed to harnessing our individual talents toward a common goal: years of happy homecomings for every client. We continue to be inspired by the unique challenge of creating a place that feels like “home” for each client. We look forward to coming to work every day.

We are privileged to live and work in a special place. Hutker Architects recognizes the importance of participating in the unique communities of which we are a part. Stewardship is one of our firm’s core values. The ethic of giving back starts with designing houses that complement their surroundings and extends to being good neighbors ourselves. We are proud to partner with organizations that are improving the communities we serve, and honored to donate time as a team and as individuals.

What's New


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Clambake!

The Clambake, a spectacular American culinary event specific to our region, originated on the coast of southeastern Massachusetts. The Wampanoag...

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Falling for the Fly

I’ve been fishing pretty much since I could walk. My dad is a talented angler and he started taking me when I was a toddler. Growing up in Vermont,...

Publications


We wanted to tell you what a magnificent house you designed. We love everything about it. The light, the lines, the feeling one has in every room of being part of this gorgeous environment.

Thanksgiving, Cramer style…
11.20.2017

As the weather turns toward winter, checking the outdoor thermometer takes priority upon waking in preparation for adding more layers, and my anticipation of Thanksgiving grows quickly! After all,  it is my favorite holiday – sure, the the travel can be a nightmare but once we get past that and settle into our destination, the warmth of this holiday so rich with meaning takes over.

Clambake!
11.20.2017

The Clambake, a spectacular American culinary event specific to our region, originated on the coast of southeastern Massachusetts. The Wampanoag Indians, from Narragansett Bay to Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket are said to have passed the tradition on for generations. For centuries before modern development shell mounds, or “middens,” towering over men,  were excavated along shorelines; the middens pinpoint exact locations of these ancient feasts. One such location is at the head of the Westport River in southeastern Massachusetts, or the “Head of Westport.” Westport, my home town, is a fishing and farming town steeped in local tradition and pride. So, naturally, my friends and I have adopted the clambake tradition from generations of our families before us. This year was our 11th annual clambake hosted for 150+ of our closest family and friends.

The bake starts a week before the big day; ordering food, collecting friends to help, gathering pallets for burning, and digging up equipment for serving, display and ambiance. The site of the clambake shifts from various friends’ (or parents’) back yards. The bake is always in an open field off in the woods, a perfect spot for camping and debauchery. The night before, out-of-towners converge at one of our homes and we prep and cook the stuffed quahogs. Early the morning of the bake, we build a bonfire over a bed of round, cannonball- like stones. As the fire heats up, our chowder starts to cook and the crew heads to the river to collect rock weed. With a truck bed full of rock weed, we head back to the bake site for set up, all the while stoking the fire. Parents and kids trickle in all afternoon, and at 4:00 we prep to face the coals, dressing up in our fireman jackets, handkerchiefs, gardening gloves and boots.

Falling for the Fly
09.11.2017

I’ve been fishing pretty much since I could walk. My dad is a talented angler and he started taking me when I was a toddler. Growing up in Vermont, we caught a lot of freshwater fish. It was always something we could do together, a bond and connection that was strengthened on family vacations to Cape Cod, where we spent hours wading the sandy flats stalking striped bass, the Cape’s crown jewel of inshore sport fishing.